NHTSA Guidelines – most important recommendations


…snippets of what was found to be for the AGA project most important parts.
From “Docket No.  NHTSA-2010-0053 Visual-Manual NHTSA Driver Distraction Guidelines For In-Vehicle Electronic Devices” that can be found here.

C.  The Visual-Manual NHTSA Guidelines for In-Vehicle Electronic Devices


Since light vehicles comprise the vast majority of the vehicle fleet, NHTSA focused its distraction research on this type of vehicle, instead of heavy trucks, medium trucks, motorcoaches, or motorcycles.  Therefore, the NHTSA Guidelines are only applicable to light vehicles, i.e., passenger cars, multipurpose passenger vehicles, and trucks and buses with a Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) of not more than 10,000 pounds.
 

 
The NHTSA Guidelines are based upon a number of fundamental principles.  These principles include:

  • The driver’s eyes should usually be looking at the road ahead,
  • The driver should be able to keep at least one hand on the steering wheel while performing a secondary task (both driving-related and non-driving related),
  • The distraction induced by any secondary task performed while driving should not exceed that associated with a baseline reference task (manual radio tuning),
  • Any task performed by a driver should be interruptible at any time,
  • The driver, not the system/device, should control the pace of task interactions, and
  • Displays should be easy for the driver to see and content presented should be easily discernible.

The NHTSA Guidelines recommend that devices be designed so that tasks can be completed by the driver while driving with glances away from the roadway of 2 seconds or less and a cumulative time spent glancing away from the roadway of 12 seconds or less.

V. Device interface recommendations


F. Per Se Lock Outs


The following electronic device tasks are recommended for per se lock out and should always be inaccessible for performance by the driver while driving:

 1. Device functions and tasks not intended to be used by a driver while driving.   

 2. Manual Text Entry.  Manual text entry by the driver for the purpose of text-based messaging, other communication, or internet browsing.  
 

The following electronic device tasks are recommended for per se lock out and should always be a) inaccessible for performance by the driver while driving and b) inaccessible for performance by a passenger if the related display is within view of the driver properly restrained by a seat belt:

 3. Displaying Video.  Displaying (or permitting the display of) video including, but not limited to, video-based entertainment and video-based communications including video phoning and videoconferencing.

Exceptions:
  1. The display of video images when presented in accordance with the requirements of any FMVSS.
  2. The display of a video image of the area directly behind a vehicle for the purpose of aiding a driver performing a maneuver in which the vehicle’s transmission is in reverse gear (including parking, trailer hitching), until any of the following conditions occurs:
    1. The vehicle reaches a maximum forward speed of 10 mph;
    2. After the vehicle has shifted out of reverse, it has traveled a maximum of 10 meters; or
    3. After the vehicle has shifted out of reverse, a maximum of 10 seconds has elapsed.
  3. Map displays.  The visual presentation of dynamic map and/or location information in a two-dimensional format, with or without perspective, for the purpose of providing navigational information or driving directions when requested by the driver (assuming the presentation of this information conforms to all other recommendations of these Guidelines). However, the display of informational detail not critical to navigation, such as photorealistic images, satellite images, or three-dimensional images is not recommended. 
 
 4. Displaying Images.  Displaying (or permitting the display of) non-video graphical or photographic images.

Exceptions:  
  1. Displaying driving-related images including maps (assuming the presentation of this information conforms to all other recommendations of these Guidelines).  However, the display of map informational detail not critical to navigation, such as photorealistic images, satellite images, or three-dimensional images is not recommended.
  2. Static graphical and photographic images displayed for the purpose of aiding a driver to efficiently make a selection in the context of a non-driving-related task (e.g., music) is acceptable if the image automatically extinguishes from the display upon completion of the task.  If appropriate, these images may be presented along with short text descriptions that conform to these Guidelines.
  3. Internationally standardized symbols and icons, as well as Trademark™ and Registered® symbols, are not considered static graphical or photographic images.
  
5. Automatically Scrolling Text.  The display of scrolling (either horizontally or vertically) text that is moving at a pace not controlled by the driver.

6. Displaying Text to Be Read.  The visual presentation of the following types of non-driving-related task textual information:
 
  • Books
  • Periodical publications (including newspapers, magazines, articles)
  • Web page content
  • Social media content
  • Text-based advertising and marketing
  • Text-based messages (see definition) and correspondence

However, the visual presentation of limited amounts of other types of text during a testable task is acceptable.  The maximum amount of text that should be visually presented during a single testable task is determined by the task acceptance test protocols contained in these Guidelines.

H.  Sound Level.

Devices should not produce sound levels likely to mask warnings either from within or from outside the vehicle, or that cause distraction.  The device sound level control should demonstrate its ability to adjust sound levels down to a fully muted level.

J.  Interruptibility.

Devices should not require uninterruptible sequences of visual-manual interactions by a driver.  A driver should be able to resume an operator-interrupted sequence of visual-manual interactions with a device at the point of interruption or at another logical point in the sequence.